The Freedom Trap

Of all the values society holds dear today, freedom must top the list! As we look around our nations and communities, what freedoms do we value? We value freedom of speech, freedom of travel, and freedom to act as individuals. We cherish freedom of choice—in marriage, family, religion, and myriad other things. Many even seem to value freedom from marriage, freedom from children, or freedom from religion, and the list goes on seemingly endlessly. But does freedom have a “price”?

We memorialize freedom in our Independence Day celebrations. And we use freedom in our mottos—for example, “Live free or die” is the motto of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. Yes, freedom seems to be an ubiquitous value the world over. And if people or nations do not currently have freedoms, they desperately long for them!

Yet with all the freedoms afforded to our modern society, are we happier than we were in the past when there were arguably fewer freedoms? Are we truly more liberated today? In our societal rush to become free from the shackles of religion, is it possible that we have become entrapped through making freedom and liberty our new “gods?”

In a recent article for PJ Media, author and commentator D. C. McAllister pondered over the idea that “The idol of freedom is the cause of our loneliness.” In her article, Ms. McAllister drew the following profound conclusion about our freedom to choose for ourselves:

“While individualism and self-interest are fundamental to our happiness as politically free people, they have a dark side when out of balance. This was a concern of Alexis de Tocqueville when he commented on the development of the American democracy. Individualism had a way of separating the much-needed bonds of society. Left unchecked, families would no longer be close. Friendship would degenerate into relationships of convenience not commitment. Communities would fray. Selfishness and narcissism would drive away empathy and self-sacrifice. Intimate social connections would be lost.”

Is this not what we are witnessing in society today? Ms. McAllister went on to identify the crux of the problem:

“When morality is rejected and the subjective becomes the standard for truth, the subject [that’s us] is instantly and permanently isolated. He is living on an island of one… Freedom from a relationship with God has plunged us into existential angst and a loss of significance. Freedom from virtue, judgment, law, and regulating moral principles has cast us into a sea of abandonment.”

Is there any wonder why, in this age of freedom, there is less happiness, more hatred, and higher rates of drug use and suicide than, perhaps, ever before? In our quest for the ultimate freedoms, we have cast off the virtues and values that can truly make us free!

In a sad twist of irony, much of society has thrown off Judeo-Christian values and their source—the Bible. These things hold the keys and outline the path to true freedom and happiness. The teachings of the Bible reveal that it is actually God’s truth that will set us free (John 8:32), not our opinions or feelings. And, contrary to the beliefs of much of modern Christianity, God’s law—including the Ten Commandments—is called “the perfect law of LIBERTY” (James 1:25)! If we seriously consider this, we should see that adherence to God’s laws would actually begin to free society from crime, murder, hate, depression, exhaustion, loneliness, and so many other modern plagues.

Society has allowed its relentless pursuit of freedom to become its most important priority today, placing it above friends, family, colleagues, allies—our neighbors, whom we are to love even as ourselves (Leviticus 19:18; Matthew 19:19). The idolatrous pursuit of freedom has become a painful trap that is actually holding society captive. But there is another, happier, more fulfilling way within our reach! To find out more about this way be sure to watch our illuminating and encouraging telecast “What is Freedom?”

Frogs and Horses

While no frog has a horse, every horse has four “frogs!” How is this possible? It has to do with animal anatomy, and the genius behind its design can teach us a lot about our Creator.

Horses, donkeys, and mules are of the domesticated equine “kind,” having four slender legs ending with solid hooves. Each of a horse’s hooves has a sole on the back, and each sole has a V-shaped rubbery pad, which is called a “frog.” This pad performs three functions. The first is gripping slippery surfaces, and the second is absorbing shock. But the third, and most vital, is helping pump blood back up the leg into the body for circulation each time the horse puts pressure on it. Evolutionary theory cannot explain how horses evolved with hearts too small for their bodies without this separate biological device.

When a horse is sick or injured, cowboys will say, “We need to get him back on his feet.” This is because if the afflicted horse lies down for too long, blood will not circulate through its legs properly and the horse will die. This explains why injured race horses can seldom be nursed back to strength and are often “put down.” This complex system of blood circulation had to be complete in the very first horse for it to be “good” (Genesis 1:25).

The frog fulfills a unique purpose, without which the horse could not survive! God created it as part of a functionally complete system.

God reigns supreme, and He reveals His purpose to those He calls to Jesus Christ (John 6:44; see Amos 3:7). He does nothing in vain or without planning and design, especially in the lives of those with whom He is working. The Apostle Paul said as much about the various members in the Church. “But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it” (1 Corinthians 12:23–24). Beauty and honor do not come to mind when describing a horse’s frog, a “less honorable” member, so close to the ground. But, God places each where He wants them, and holds every person accountable for their own capabilities (Luke 12:48).

God calls certain people in this age to be humble, teachable servants (Romans 12:3). God gives them different spiritual gifts (Romans 12:6) for His purpose and the “profit of all,” not only for their own personal salvation (1 Corinthians 12:1–7). Ultimately, God has a great purpose for all of mankind, but we have much to learn.

Our consciousness makes us different from horses and other animals. But unlike them, we also aren’t complete. Yet, we can know the purpose of life, and we can learn the astonishing truths of God’s Way. With that knowledge, and His help, we can become complete spiritual creations.

When it comes to understanding and appreciating the beauty of God’s great design, you might enjoy the article, “Is Darwinian Evolution Dead?”

Frogs and Horses

While no frog has a horse, every horse has four “frogs!” How is this possible? It has to do with animal anatomy, and the genius behind its design can teach us a lot about our Creator.

Horses, donkeys, and mules are of the domesticated equine “kind,” having four slender legs ending with solid hooves. Each of a horse’s hooves has a sole on the back, and each sole has a V-shaped rubbery pad, which is called a “frog.” This pad performs three functions. The first is gripping slippery surfaces, and the second is absorbing shock. But the third, and most vital, is helping pump blood back up the leg into the body for circulation each time the horse puts pressure on it. Evolutionary theory cannot explain how horses evolved with hearts too small for their bodies without this separate biological device.

When a horse is sick or injured, cowboys will say, “We need to get him back on his feet.” This is because if the afflicted horse lies down for too long, blood will not circulate through its legs properly and the horse will die. This explains why injured race horses can seldom be nursed back to strength and are often “put down.” This complex system of blood circulation had to be complete in the very first horse for it to be “good” (Genesis 1:25).

The frog fulfills a unique purpose, without which the horse could not survive! God created it as part of a functionally complete system.

God reigns supreme, and He reveals His purpose to those He calls to Jesus Christ (John 6:44; see Amos 3:7). He does nothing in vain or without planning and design, especially in the lives of those with whom He is working. The Apostle Paul said as much about the various members in the Church. “But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it” (1 Corinthians 12:23–24). Beauty and honor do not come to mind when describing a horse’s frog, a “less honorable” member, so close to the ground. But, God places each where He wants them, and holds every person accountable for their own capabilities (Luke 12:48).

God calls certain people in this age to be humble, teachable servants (Romans 12:3). God gives them different spiritual gifts (Romans 12:6) for His purpose and the “profit of all,” not only for their own personal salvation (1 Corinthians 12:1–7). Ultimately, God has a great purpose for all of mankind, but we have much to learn.

Our consciousness makes us different from horses and other animals. But unlike them, we also aren’t complete. Yet, we can know the purpose of life, and we can learn the astonishing truths of God’s Way. With that knowledge, and His help, we can become complete spiritual creations.

When it comes to understanding and appreciating the beauty of God’s great design, you might enjoy the article, “Is Darwinian Evolution Dead?”

Frogs and Horses

While no frog has a horse, every horse has four “frogs!” How is this possible? It has to do with animal anatomy, and the genius behind its design can teach us a lot about our Creator.

Horses, donkeys, and mules are of the domesticated equine “kind,” having four slender legs ending with solid hooves. Each of a horse’s hooves has a sole on the back, and each sole has a V-shaped rubbery pad, which is called a “frog.” This pad performs three functions. The first is gripping slippery surfaces, and the second is absorbing shock. But the third, and most vital, is helping pump blood back up the leg into the body for circulation each time the horse puts pressure on it. Evolutionary theory cannot explain how horses evolved with hearts too small for their bodies without this separate biological device.

When a horse is sick or injured, cowboys will say, “We need to get him back on his feet.” This is because if the afflicted horse lies down for too long, blood will not circulate through its legs properly and the horse will die. This explains why injured race horses can seldom be nursed back to strength and are often “put down.” This complex system of blood circulation had to be complete in the very first horse for it to be “good” (Genesis 1:25).

The frog fulfills a unique purpose, without which the horse could not survive! God created it as part of a functionally complete system.

God reigns supreme, and He reveals His purpose to those He calls to Jesus Christ (John 6:44; see Amos 3:7). He does nothing in vain or without planning and design, especially in the lives of those with whom He is working. The Apostle Paul said as much about the various members in the Church. “But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it” (1 Corinthians 12:23–24). Beauty and honor do not come to mind when describing a horse’s frog, a “less honorable” member, so close to the ground. But, God places each where He wants them, and holds every person accountable for their own capabilities (Luke 12:48).

God calls certain people in this age to be humble, teachable servants (Romans 12:3). God gives them different spiritual gifts (Romans 12:6) for His purpose and the “profit of all,” not only for their own personal salvation (1 Corinthians 12:1–7). Ultimately, God has a great purpose for all of mankind, but we have much to learn.

Our consciousness makes us different from horses and other animals. But unlike them, we also aren’t complete. Yet, we can know the purpose of life, and we can learn the astonishing truths of God’s Way. With that knowledge, and His help, we can become complete spiritual creations.

When it comes to understanding and appreciating the beauty of God’s great design, you might enjoy the article, “Is Darwinian Evolution Dead?”

Frogs and Horses

While no frog has a horse, every horse has four “frogs!” How is this possible? It has to do with animal anatomy, and the genius behind its design can teach us a lot about our Creator.

Horses, donkeys, and mules are of the domesticated equine “kind,” having four slender legs ending with solid hooves. Each of a horse’s hooves has a sole on the back, and each sole has a V-shaped rubbery pad, which is called a “frog.” This pad performs three functions. The first is gripping slippery surfaces, and the second is absorbing shock. But the third, and most vital, is helping pump blood back up the leg into the body for circulation each time the horse puts pressure on it. Evolutionary theory cannot explain how horses evolved with hearts too small for their bodies without this separate biological device.

When a horse is sick or injured, cowboys will say, “We need to get him back on his feet.” This is because if the afflicted horse lies down for too long, blood will not circulate through its legs properly and the horse will die. This explains why injured race horses can seldom be nursed back to strength and are often “put down.” This complex system of blood circulation had to be complete in the very first horse for it to be “good” (Genesis 1:25).

The frog fulfills a unique purpose, without which the horse could not survive! God created it as part of a functionally complete system.

God reigns supreme, and He reveals His purpose to those He calls to Jesus Christ (John 6:44; see Amos 3:7). He does nothing in vain or without planning and design, especially in the lives of those with whom He is working. The Apostle Paul said as much about the various members in the Church. “But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it” (1 Corinthians 12:23–24). Beauty and honor do not come to mind when describing a horse’s frog, a “less honorable” member, so close to the ground. But, God places each where He wants them, and holds every person accountable for their own capabilities (Luke 12:48).

God calls certain people in this age to be humble, teachable servants (Romans 12:3). God gives them different spiritual gifts (Romans 12:6) for His purpose and the “profit of all,” not only for their own personal salvation (1 Corinthians 12:1–7). Ultimately, God has a great purpose for all of mankind, but we have much to learn.

Our consciousness makes us different from horses and other animals. But unlike them, we also aren’t complete. Yet, we can know the purpose of life, and we can learn the astonishing truths of God’s Way. With that knowledge, and His help, we can become complete spiritual creations.

When it comes to understanding and appreciating the beauty of God’s great design, you might enjoy the article, “Is Darwinian Evolution Dead?”

Frogs and Horses

While no frog has a horse, every horse has four “frogs!” How is this possible? It has to do with animal anatomy, and the genius behind its design can teach us a lot about our Creator.

Horses, donkeys, and mules are of the domesticated equine “kind,” having four slender legs ending with solid hooves. Each of a horse’s hooves has a sole on the back, and each sole has a V-shaped rubbery pad, which is called a “frog.” This pad performs three functions. The first is gripping slippery surfaces, and the second is absorbing shock. But the third, and most vital, is helping pump blood back up the leg into the body for circulation each time the horse puts pressure on it. Evolutionary theory cannot explain how horses evolved with hearts too small for their bodies without this separate biological device.

When a horse is sick or injured, cowboys will say, “We need to get him back on his feet.” This is because if the afflicted horse lies down for too long, blood will not circulate through its legs properly and the horse will die. This explains why injured race horses can seldom be nursed back to strength and are often “put down.” This complex system of blood circulation had to be complete in the very first horse for it to be “good” (Genesis 1:25).

The frog fulfills a unique purpose, without which the horse could not survive! God created it as part of a functionally complete system.

God reigns supreme, and He reveals His purpose to those He calls to Jesus Christ (John 6:44; see Amos 3:7). He does nothing in vain or without planning and design, especially in the lives of those with whom He is working. The Apostle Paul said as much about the various members in the Church. “But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it” (1 Corinthians 12:23–24). Beauty and honor do not come to mind when describing a horse’s frog, a “less honorable” member, so close to the ground. But, God places each where He wants them, and holds every person accountable for their own capabilities (Luke 12:48).

God calls certain people in this age to be humble, teachable servants (Romans 12:3). God gives them different spiritual gifts (Romans 12:6) for His purpose and the “profit of all,” not only for their own personal salvation (1 Corinthians 12:1–7). Ultimately, God has a great purpose for all of mankind, but we have much to learn.

Our consciousness makes us different from horses and other animals. But unlike them, we also aren’t complete. Yet, we can know the purpose of life, and we can learn the astonishing truths of God’s Way. With that knowledge, and His help, we can become complete spiritual creations.

When it comes to understanding and appreciating the beauty of God’s great design, you might enjoy the article, “Is Darwinian Evolution Dead?”

Frogs and Horses

While no frog has a horse, every horse has four “frogs!” How is this possible? It has to do with animal anatomy, and the genius behind its design can teach us a lot about our Creator.

Horses, donkeys, and mules are of the domesticated equine “kind,” having four slender legs ending with solid hooves. Each of a horse’s hooves has a sole on the back, and each sole has a V-shaped rubbery pad, which is called a “frog.” This pad performs three functions. The first is gripping slippery surfaces, and the second is absorbing shock. But the third, and most vital, is helping pump blood back up the leg into the body for circulation each time the horse puts pressure on it. Evolutionary theory cannot explain how horses evolved with hearts too small for their bodies without this separate biological device.

When a horse is sick or injured, cowboys will say, “We need to get him back on his feet.” This is because if the afflicted horse lies down for too long, blood will not circulate through its legs properly and the horse will die. This explains why injured race horses can seldom be nursed back to strength and are often “put down.” This complex system of blood circulation had to be complete in the very first horse for it to be “good” (Genesis 1:25).

The frog fulfills a unique purpose, without which the horse could not survive! God created it as part of a functionally complete system.

God reigns supreme, and He reveals His purpose to those He calls to Jesus Christ (John 6:44; see Amos 3:7). He does nothing in vain or without planning and design, especially in the lives of those with whom He is working. The Apostle Paul said as much about the various members in the Church. “But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it” (1 Corinthians 12:23–24). Beauty and honor do not come to mind when describing a horse’s frog, a “less honorable” member, so close to the ground. But, God places each where He wants them, and holds every person accountable for their own capabilities (Luke 12:48).

God calls certain people in this age to be humble, teachable servants (Romans 12:3). God gives them different spiritual gifts (Romans 12:6) for His purpose and the “profit of all,” not only for their own personal salvation (1 Corinthians 12:1–7). Ultimately, God has a great purpose for all of mankind, but we have much to learn.

Our consciousness makes us different from horses and other animals. But unlike them, we also aren’t complete. Yet, we can know the purpose of life, and we can learn the astonishing truths of God’s Way. With that knowledge, and His help, we can become complete spiritual creations.

When it comes to understanding and appreciating the beauty of God’s great design, you might enjoy the article, “Is Darwinian Evolution Dead?”